5 things about AI you may have missed today: CJI speaks on AI, Nicholas Cage on deepfakes, and more

At a time when Black Friday weekend is the buzz of town, artificial intelligence still manages to capture eyeballs with some interesting developments. In the first news, the Chief Justice of India, D.Y. Chandrachud spoke on AI at a virtual conference today, highlighting the problem of ethical treatment of AI. In other news, Hollywood actor Nicholas Cage spoke about deepfakes in movies, where actors’ likenesses can be used to make movies without needing their physical presence, and called it a ‘nightmare’. This and more in today’s AI roundup. Let us take a closer look.

CJI raises a question on AI’s ethical treatment

As per PTI, During the 36th ‘LAWASIA’ conference, the CJI addressed the plenary session virtually, focusing on the theme “Identity, the Individual and the State – New Paths to Liberty.” The Chief Justice emphasized the concept of liberty, quoting “Your right to swing your fist ends where my nose begins.” He delved into the challenges posed by AI in the digital age, highlighting the complex relationship between AI and personhood. Reflecting on the ethical treatment of AI technologies, he raised questions about whether all beings, including human-like robots, should be entitled to personhood and citizenship based on their identity.

Nicholas Cage on the use of AI deepfakes in Hollywood

In an interview with Wired, Cage spoke about his dislike for his deepfakes and AI-generated versions to feature in movies even after his death. He said, “First: I have no control over what they’re doing with my likeness. Second: Where’s the heart? I really believe that people are going to know that there’s no heartbeat in those eyes. There’s no heartbeat in that voice. There’s no heartbeat in that sound and movement. It’s not natural, it’s a robot, and I think that is very scary”.

Research: Liberal media more opposed to AI

Research from Virginia Tech University revealed that articles from liberal media express more opposition to artificial intelligence (AI) compared to conservative media, as per PTI. The concerns cited include worries about AI exacerbating racial and gender biases, as well as contributing to income inequality. The researchers suggest that as media sentiment often reflects public opinion and influences policymakers, these findings could shape future political discussions on AI. The study, published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science, suggests that differences in media sentiment may influence public attitudes toward AI.

Nvidia delays launch of new China-focused AI chip

Nvidia has informed its customers in China about a delay in the launch of its new artificial intelligence chip, the H20, designed to comply with U.S. export rules, reports Reuters. The delay, until the first quarter of next year, is attributed to the chip being the most powerful among three developed to adhere to recent U.S. export restrictions. The postponed launch may pose challenges for Nvidia in maintaining market share in China against local competitors like Huawei. Originally expected on November 16, the H20 launch is now anticipated in February or March, according to sources.

AICTE plans to upskill using ethics-focused AI

According to a report by Education Times, the All India Council For Technical Education (AICTE) has instructed colleges and technical institutions to widely share the ‘National Program on Artificial Intelligence’ report. This report, released in June 2023 as part of the Union Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology’s initiative, emphasizes promoting upskilling in technical sectors, particularly focusing on ethics in AI. The committee behind the report recommends starting AI and data science training at early school levels and provides a suggested curriculum aligned with the National Higher Education Qualifications Framework and the National Credit Framework.

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